Fitzgerald Casino Black Hawk Colorado

Don Barden. The Michigan born Cable television mogul made history when - in 2001 - he acquired three Fitzgerald Casinos in Las Vegas for $149 million. This made him the first African-American to own multiple casino operations in Las Vegas. Barden already owned casinos from Mississippi to Colarado.

Don Barden. The Michigan born Cable television mogul made history when - in 2001 - he acquired three Fitzgerald Casinos in Las Vegas for $149 million. This made him the first African-American to own multiple casino operations in Las Vegas. Barden already owned casinos from Mississippi to Colarado. submitted by TheAfternoonStandard to Blackfellas [link] [comments]

Fitzgerald's Casino Tunica Review- Room, Casino, Buffet

Fitzgerald's Casino Tunica Review- Room, Casino, Buffet submitted by Mamygail05 to travel [link] [comments]

[Offer] 5 Postcards of Reno, Nevada; 4 are Vintage [WW]

I have 5 postcards to offer WW. All show an entrance to Reno with a street view.
There are 2 postcards that are drawings with vintage scenes of Virginia Street looking south around the 50's.
There are 2 postcards showing the entrance to the casino area during the daytime around the 70's.
The 5th postcard is a nighttime photo of the arch by Fitzgerald's Casino at the present day.
If you would like one, comment below on which one you want and send a PM with the subject line "Reno" or mention Reno in your message with your mailing address.
Exchanges are appreciated of a touristy postcard of where you live but not required.
submitted by tigerlady13 to RandomActsofCards [link] [comments]

In the beginning of Oceans 11 (2001) Rusty tells Danny they will need "a Boesky, a Jim Brown, a Miss Daisy, two Jethros and a Leon Spinks, not to mention the biggest Ella Fitzgerald ever!" These are references to old cons from the 20th century and Rusty just gave away how they will rob the casino.

A Boesky: Saul playing Lyman Zerga. This is a reference to Ivan Boesky, a big-time trader on Wall Street who got caught committing securities fraud. The con is about a wealthy bankroller who has insider information.
A Jim Brown: the confrontation between Frank Catton and Linus Caldwell, staged to distract Terry Benedict so that Linus can lift the security codes to the vault. Named for the famous American football player
A Miss Daisy: references the SWAT truck our con men used as their getaway car. 'driving miss daisy' is a movie about a woman who has to get a chauffeur to drive her around. under the guise of the SWAT truck, Danny, Rusty and the gang can escape without a hitch.
Two Jethros: refers to the Malloy brothers, Turk and Virgil. The two jethros are the 'hillbilly, gear-headed types" who are hired to look after miss daisy. In the movie, they provide general two-man work like the distraction they pull with the balloons covering the security camera on the casino floor so Livingston can get into the video surveillance room.
Leon Spinks: the distraction in the form of disrupting the boxing match. there was this episode of NCIS once where the director went home to Chicago to investigate the death of his boxer friend. in the episode, they mentioned this boxing match where Leon Spinks beat Muhammad Ali, and it was a total upset that no one expected. no one expected the power to go out in the middle of the match in the movie, either, and it created absolute chaos, which was great for our con artists.
Ella Fitzgerald: the idea to loop a tape of a robbery over Benedict's security system, a robbery which had actually been staged the previous night as a distraction while the real robbery takes place. it comes from a commercial for memorex i saw in my ad production class the other week where a recording of Ella Fitzgerald's voice breaks a glass, then the voice over says, "is it live or is it memorex?" the concept is that Benedict doesn't know if the robbery he's seeing is the robbery that's actually happening.
Source: Quora https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-names-and-meanings-of-all-the-cons-in-the-Oceans-movie-trilogy
submitted by bigice75 to MovieDetails [link] [comments]

Molly’s Garden was a great restaurant inside of the Fitzgeralds Hotel and Casino in Reno, NV. It went out of business several years ago. I managed to get a copy of their potato leek soup recipe and have it saved in my recipe collection. It’s absolutely delicious.

Molly’s Garden was a great restaurant inside of the Fitzgeralds Hotel and Casino in Reno, NV. It went out of business several years ago. I managed to get a copy of their potato leek soup recipe and have it saved in my recipe collection. It’s absolutely delicious. submitted by Stuxnet15 to recipes [link] [comments]

Fitzgerald's Hotel and Casino, formerly located on Fremont Street, c. 1990.

Fitzgerald's Hotel and Casino, formerly located on Fremont Street, c. 1990. submitted by frecklefactor to vegas [link] [comments]

analysts

ers: Bally's Corporation (BALY) resumed with a Hold at Stifel; tgt $50 Bloom Energy (BE) initiated with an Accumulate at Johnson Rice; tgt $32 Calyxt (CLXT) initiated with a Buy at H.C. Wainwright; tgt $10 Century Casinos (CNTY) resumed with a Buy at Stifel; tgt $9 Cerevel Therapeutics (CERE) initiated with a Buy at Goldman; tgt $24 Chinook Therapeutics (KDNY) initiated with an Overweight at Cantor Fitzgerald; tgt $31 Everi (EVRI) resumed with a Buy at Stifel; tgt $16 Fisker (FSR) initiated with an Underperform at Wolfe Research; tgt $16 Formula One Group (FWONA) initiated with a Buy at Guggenheim; tgt $47 Intra-Cellular Therapies (ITCI) initiated with a Buy at Goldman; tgt $38 Lordstown Motors (RIDE) initiated with an Underperform at Wolfe Research; tgt $14 Monarch Casino & Resort (MCRI) resumed with a Buy at Stifel; tgt $63 Oak Street Health (OSH) initiated with an Outperform at Raymond James; tgt $65 OSI Systems (OSIS) initiated with an Outperform at Oppenheimer; tgt $110 PlayAGS (AGS) resumed with a Buy at Stifel; tgt $8 Scientific Games (SGMS) resumed with a Buy at Stifel; tgt $46 Walt Disney (DIS) initiated with a Buy at Truist; tgt $175 Workhorse Group (WKHS) initiated with a Peer Perform at Wolfe Research
submitted by upbstock to Optionmillionaires [link] [comments]

Montreux - what to see, top attractions

Swiss Riviera on the shores of Lake Geneva - Montreux! Why you need to go there, what to see and where to go in Montreux and the surrounding area, as well as how to get there and where to live.
The pandemic disrupted my travel plans a little, but the whole rhythm of life. And that was a big blow to me. During 2019 - early 2020, I traveled almost non-stop, making only rare stops in Kiev (I'm from Ukraine).
One of the most striking travels is the Swiss Alps, Lake Geneva and the part of France that borders Switzerland. Today I will tell you about Montreux, a trip to this city was largely due to my local friends. Thank you guys!

The main attractions of Montreux

Montreux is a very small city and I cannot say that it has the beauty that we are used to seeing in ancient European cities. Montreux is more modern than historical. Usually my main criterion for evaluating a city is whether I want to return? So you want to come back to Montreux again and again, or even better - stay here for a while.
If time is short, just walk along Lake Geneva, this will be enough to fall in love with Montreux. You can heighten your senses by looking at the city and the surrounding Alps from the water with a glass of champagne or local dry white.
The main thing in Montreux is the views of Lake Geneva and its surroundings and stories associated with famous people who have visited the city at different times - from royalty, musicians and actors to famous prisoners.

Chateau Chillon fortress

A 13th century fortress that stands on a small island in Lake Geneva, but actually on the shore. Undoubtedly, Chillon Castle is the main architectural attraction of Montreux.
It is best to look at the fortress from the water.
The main function of the castle of the fortress in antiquity was the family estate of the Counts of Savoy in the Middle Ages. The second function is a prison where many famous prisoners were kept.
Location: Avenue de Chillon 21, Veitaud / Montreux, Switzerland, just a few minutes drive from the city center, I walked pretty quickly.

Jazz Festival in Montreux

The world's number one landmark event. Somewhere it is abruptly even the Olympic Games in sports. I was both lucky and unlucky at the same time - I got to Montreux on the eve of the festival, literally a week before the start and saw all the preparations and the beginning "movement", but the travel schedule did not allow me to stay.
The festival was called jazz in its origin - it was conceived as jazz. But after 1970, such luminaries of the rock scene as Queen, Frank Zappa, Deer Purple were its active participants.
Remember the famous Smoke on the water Deep Purple? The song was written in memory of the event when the casino burned down in Montreux in 1971 just during the performance of Frank Zappa. Thick white smoke drifted over Lake Geneva, which inspired Gillan to write this song.
Miles Davis, Nina Simone and Ella Fitzgerald have performed at the festival at various times; after the 1970s, non-jazz artists such as Pink Floyd, Deep Purple, BB King, Oscar Peterson and others participated in it.
The festival can also be viewed free of charge from a boat or boat on Lake Geneva.
Location: Avenue Claude Nobs 5, Montreux, Switzerland, right on the shores of Lake Geneva.

City promenade in Montreux

The promenade is a 3.5 km long pedestrian road. from the Château de Chillon to Clarence. There are many flowers along the promenade, so the best time to walk is in spring. Each view from the boardwalk is a postcard, especially in calm weather, when the reflections of the castle and mountain peaks are especially beautiful.
Location: Along Lake Geneva, Montreux, Switzerland

Queen studio

In Montreux, the studio of the Queen group was located - Montreux Mountain, 7 albums of the group were recorded here. After Freddie's death, a sculpture of a musician was installed on the Montreux quay.
Location: Casino Barrièrede Montreux, RueduTheatre 9, Montreux, Switzerland

Gorge du Chauderon

In the old town is the beginning of the hiking trail along the gorge du Chauderon. The gorge is carved by the river La Baye-de-Montreux, which flows into Lake Geneva. The trail leading to and from Montreux is clearly marked.
Location: Old Town, Montreux, Switzerland

Lamp trail Les Pléiades

A non-trail path in Les Pléiades, which is called a lamppost for the fact that there are lanterns along it that illuminate the path.
The Lantern Trail is the main winter attraction in Montreux. I knew about her, so I included this attraction in the list.
It is better to walk along the lamppost path in winter, when the light of the lanterns is reflected in the snowdrifts, giving it a slight mysticism.
How to get there: To get on the trail you need to take the train from Montreux train station to Les Pléiades station. We leave and follow the signs along the trail illuminated by lanterns. Better to rent snowshoes. End your walk with a Swiss fondue tasting at Les Pléiades.
Address: Les Pléiades, Montreux, Switzerland

Lavaux Vineyard Terraces

Lavaux vineyards are included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Tourists love them not for the lists, but for the panoramic views along the path and for the wine cellars where you can taste everything that is produced from local grapes.
Do you know why Swiss wine is not sold in your country? Because the Swiss drink almost everything they produce. So say the Swiss themselves, if anything. But at home, in Kiev, I did not see a lot of Swiss wine.
The Lavaux vineyards are 830 hectares between Lausanne and Montreux. Most use the Lavaux Express or Lavaux Panoramic special trains. But it is better to walk along the trails along the vineyards.
Location: Lavaux Vineyard Terraces, Puidu, Switzerland

Daffodil trail

This attraction is also in our bookmarks if we get to Montreux in the spring. There are many flower trails in the surrounding mountains. The tourist office of the city has maps with marked trails, or use any cartographic service - there are routes there too.

Walk on Lake Geneva

I left this activity for dessert. The views from Lake Geneva are not at all like what we see from the shore. It is ideal to combine both walks, water and walking. Be sure to take a boat trip to the Lake Geneva Conservation Area - there is a lot of wildlife, birds and aquatic life.
On Lake Geneva, you can rent any small boat - from a water catamaran or canoe to a boat. You can take a ticket for a pleasure boat, but the privacy of the moment is violated, you will have to ride with a crowd of tourists.
I was lucky - I admired Montreux on a private motor boat.

Conclusion

Montreux definitely has a lot to see and have fun for the solo tourist. If you are from Europe, especially Eastern Europe, I strongly recommend that you familiarize yourself in your free time.
This is my first such major post, I will be glad to hear your criticism and suggestions. Thanks for your attention!
Pleasant journey, friends.

P.S. A few words about travel insurance

You do not need insurance to enter Switzerland, but for your own confidence and wallet safety it is a must! Treatment in Switzerland is very expensive, besides, insurance saves you from having to look for a clinic or run for medicines, you never know what can happen. So take care of everything in advance and your journey will go smoothly.
submitted by CoolKidsBlogs to solotravel [link] [comments]

just completed my 10 book reading challenge for this year, any recommendations based of what i’ve read?

so as per every year, i set a challenge of the number of books i would like to read for the year. unfortunately, for the past two years, i’ve been slacking in terms of reading, only being able to read 2 or 4 books a year. but fortunately i have been able to get back into the habit of reading and it’s quite interesting to say the least. these are the books i have read this year:
while yes some of these are some of the most popular books to read, i thought these would be good entry points to discover more things i may like. so based of these reads, what do you think i should i read next? i’m open to most things, not a fan of historical fiction or horror, just preference.
submitted by disxopanic to suggestmeabook [link] [comments]

Official Top 100 Albums of the 2010's - Nomination Thread #2 RESULTS

Welcome to the results from our second nomination thread for our Top 100 Albums of the 2010's project! Here's a short reminder of how this project works:
We will be collectively selecting and ranking the top 100 albums of the decade together over the next few weeks. The process will be broken into 3 phases:

  1. Nomination
  2. Top 100 Selection
  3. Top 100 Ranking

2814 - 2814 (2014)
Above & Beyond - Group Therapy (2011)
Against All Logic - 2012 - 2017 (2018)
Alix Perez - Chroma Chords (2013)
Alon Mor - Long Awaited Journey (2017)
Anamunaguchi - USA (2019)
Andrew Bayer - It's Artificial (2011)
Andrew Bayer - If It Were You, We'd Never Leave (2013)
Andrew Bayer - In My Last Life (2018)
Aphex Twin - Syro (2014)
Apparat - A Devil's Walk (2011)
Arca - Arca (2017)
Avicii - True (2013)
Baauer - Aa (2016)
Bassnectar - Divergent Spectrum (2011)
Bassnectar - Into The Sun (2015)
Baths - Cerulean (2010)
Ben Frost - A U R O R A (2014)
Bicep - Bicep (2017)
Blackmill - Miracle (2011)
Bluetech - Love Songs to the Source (2010)
Boards of Canada - Tomorrow's Harvest (2013)
Bonobo - Black Sands (2010)
Bonobo - The North Borders (2013)
Bonobo - Migration (2017)
Boyz Noize - Out The Black (2012)
Boyz Noize - Mayday (2016)
Breakbot - By Your Side (2012)
Burial - Tunes 2011 to 2019 (2019)
C2C - Tetra (2012)
C418 - Minecraft Volume Alpha (2011)
Calibre - The Deep (2017)
Calvin Harris - 18 Months (2012)
Calvin Harris - Funk Wav Bounces Vol 1 (2017)
Camo & Krooked - Zeitgeist (2013)
Camo & Krooked - Mosaik (2017)
Carbon Based Lifeforms - Interloper (2010)
Carbon Based Lifeforms - Derilects (2017)
Caribou - Swim (2010)
Caribou - Our Love (2014)
Cassius - Dreams (2019)
Chase & Status - No More Idols (2011)
Chrome Sparks - Chrome Sparks (2018)
Chromeo - Business Casual (2010)
CHVRCHES - The Bones of What You Believe (2013)
Clams Casino - Instrumentals (2011)
Com Truise - Galactic Melt (2011)
Cubicolor - Brainsugar (2016)
Daft Punk - Tron: Legacy (2010)
Daft Punk - Random Access Memories (2013)
Daniel Avery - Drone Logic (2013)
Danny Brown - Atrocity Exhibition (2016)
deadmau5 - 4x4 = 12 (2010)
deadmau5 - >album title goes here< (2013)
deadmau5 - While (1<2) (2014)
deadmau5 - W:/2016ALBUM/ (2016)
Digitalism - Mirage (2016)
Disclosure - Settle (2013)
DJ Koze - Knock Knock (2018)
DJ Rashad - Double Cup (2013)
Dj Shadow - The Mountain Will Fall (2016)
Duck Sauce - Quack (2014)
Dusky - Outer (2016)
Emancipator - Seven Seas (2015)
Emancipator - Baralku (2017)
Eprom - Metahuman (2012)
Eric Prydz - Opus (2016)
Feed Me - Calimari Tuesday (2013)
Feed Me - High Street Creeps (2019)
FKA Twigs - LP1 (2014)
Flight Facilities - Down To Earth (2014)
Floating Points - Elainia (2015)
Floating Points - Crush (2019)
Flume - Flume (2012)
Flume - Hi, This Is Flume (2019)
Flume - Skin (2016)
Flying Lotus - Cosmogramma (2010)
Flying Lotus - Until The Quiet Comes (2012)
Flying Lotus - You're Dead (2014)
Forest Swords - Engravings (2013)
Forest Swords - Compassion (2017)
Four Tet - There Is Love In You (2010)
Four Tet - Morning / Evening (2015)
Four Tet - New Energy (2017)
G Jones - The Ineffable Truth (2018)
George Fitzgerald - All That Must Be (2018)
Gesaffelstein - Aleph (2013)
Giraffage - Too Real (2017)
Gorillaz - Plastic Beach (2010)
Grimes - Visions (2012)
Griz - Say It Loud (2015)
Griz - Good Will Prevail (2016)
Grum - Heartbeats (2010)
Home - Oddysey (2014)
Iglooghost - Neo Wax Bloom (2017)
Illenium - Ashes (2016)
Ivy Lab - Death Don't Always Taste Good (2018)
Jack U - Jack U (2015)
James Blake - James Blake (2011)
James Blake - Assume Form (2019)
James Ferraro - Far Side Virtual (2013)
Jamie XX - We're New Here (2011)
Jamie XX - In Colour (2015)
Jon Hopkins - Immunity (2013)
Jon Hopkins - Singularity (2018)
Justice - Woman Worldwide (2018)
Justice - Audio, Video, Disco (2011)
Kavinsky - Outrun (2013)
Kaytranada - 99.9 % (2016)
Kill The Noise - Occult Classic (2015)
Knife Party - Abandon Ship (2014)
Koan Sound - Polychrome (2018)
Kuedo - Severant (2011)
Lane 8 - Rise (2015)
Lane 8 - Little By Little (2018)
Lapalux - Nostalchic (2013)
Lapulux - Ruinism (2017)
LCD Soundsystem - This Is Happening (2010)
Lone - Galaxy Garden (2012)
Lone - Reality Testing (2014)
Lutrell - Into Clouds (2019)
M83 - Hurry Up, We're Dreaming (2011)
Machinedrum - Room(s) (2011)
Madeon - Adventure (2015)
Madeon - Good Faith (2019)
Major Lazer - Free The Universe (2013)
Maribou State - Kingdoms in Colour (2018)
Mat Zo - Damage Control (2013)
Mat Zo - Self Assemble (2016)
Max Cooper - Yearning For The Infinite (2019)
Mefjus - Manifest (2018)
MGMT - Little Dark Age (2018)
Moderat - II (2013)
Moderat - III (2016)
Moody Good - Moody Good (2014)
Mord Fustang - All Eyes on Mord Fustang (2012)
Motor City Drum Ensemble - Raw Cuts Vol. 1 (2010)
Mount Kibie - Love What Survives (2017)
Mr. Oizo - The Church (2014)
Mura Masa - Soundtrack To A Death (2014)
Neon Indian - Era Extrana (2011)
Nero - Welcome Reality (2011)
Nero - Between II Worlds (2015)
Netsky - Netsky (2010)
Nicolas Jaar - Space Is Only Noise (2011)
Noisia - Split The Atom (2010)
Noisia - Outer Edges (2016)
Nosaj Thing - Fated (2015)
Odesza - Summer's Gone (2012)
Odesza - In Return (2014)
Odesza - A Moment Apart (2017)
Olafur Arnalds - Re:member (2018)
Oliver - Full Circle (2017)
Oneohtrix Point Never - R Plus Seven (2013)
Oneohtrix Point Never - Garden of Delete (2015)
Pendulum - Immersion (2010)
Photay - Onism (2017)
Plaid - Reachy Prints (2014)
Plaid - Polymer (2019)
Porter Robinson - Worlds (2014)
Pretty Lights - A Color Map of the Sun (2013)
Pryda - Eric Prydz Presents: Pryda (2012)
Purity Ring - Shrines (2012)
Ratatat - Magnifique (2015)
Reso - Ricochet (2015)
Rival Consoles - Howl (2015)
Rival Consoles - Persona (2018)
RL Grime - VOID (2014)
Royksopp - The Inevitable End (2014)
Rufus Du Sol - Atlas (2013)
Rufus Du Sol - Bloom (2016)
Rufus Du Sol - Solace (2018)
Rustie - Glass Swords (2011)
Rustie - EVENIFYOUDONTBELIEVE (2015)
SBTRKT - SBTRKT (2011)
Sebastian - Total (2011)
Shlomo - Bad Vibes (2011)
Skee Mask - Compro (2018)
Skrillex - Recess (2014)
Slow Magic - How To Run Away (2014)
Slow Magic - Float (2017)
Sophie - Product (2015)
SOPHIE - Oil of Every Pearl's Un-insides (2018)
Soulwax - FROM DEEWEE (2017)
Spencer Brown - Illusion of Perfection (2018)
Spor - Caligo (2015)
Swedish House Mafia - Until Now (2012)
T.E.E.D. - Trouble (2012)
Tame Impala - Currents (2015)
Teen Daze - All of Us, Together (2012)
The Avalanches - Wildflower (2016)
The Chemical Brothers - Further (2010)
The Chemical Brothers - No Geography (2019)
The Glitch Mob - Drink The Sea (2010)
The Glitch Mob - See Without Eyes (2018)
The M Machine - Glare (2017)
The Midnight - Days of Thunder (2014)
Thom Yorke - Tomorrow's Modern Boxes (2014)
Tipper - Forward Escape (2014)
Tipper - Jettison Mind Hatch (2019)
Todd Terje - It's Album Time (2014)
Tokimonsta - Half Shadows (2013)
Toro Y Moi - Outer Peace (2018)
Tourist - U (2016)
Tourist - Wild (2019)
Troyboi - Left is Right (2017)
Two Fingers - Stunt Rhythms (2012)
Tycho - Dive (2011)
Tycho - Awake (2014)
Tycho - Epoch (2016)
Tycho - Weather (2019)
Uppermost - Polis (2011)
What So Not - Not All The Beautiful Things (2018)
Wolfgang Gartner - Weekend In America (2011)
XXYYXX - XXYYXX (2012)
Yotto - Hyperfall (2018)
Zed's Dead - Northern Lights (2016)
Zedd - Clarity (2012)
ZHU - GENERATIONWHY (2016)
ZHU - Ringo's Desert (2018)

Come back here on Thursday for the final nomination thread. This is your last chance to get any album not listed above in contention for the top 100!
- The Mod Team
submitted by adirtybubble to electronicmusic [link] [comments]

505 books to read in quarantine for people who are bored af

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Kasimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to teenagers [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine If You’re Bored and Kinda Like Books (in No Particular Order)

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to cleanagers [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to booksuggestions [link] [comments]

Weekend roundup 3/6-9

Around Town:
Movies:
Sports:
Reddit - Twin Cities Social meet-ups - https://www.reddit.com/twincitiessocial/
Minnesota Brewery Event Calendar - https://minnesotabreweries.com/event-directory
Minneapolis Park Events - https://www.minneapolisparks.org/events/
Secrets of the city - http://www.secretsofthecity.com/
Minnesota Monthly Event Calendar - http://www.minnesotamonthly.com/Calenda
MSP Magazine Event Calendar - http://mspmag.com/search/event/events-calenda#page=1
Minneapolis Northwest Event Calendar - https://www.minneapolisnorthwest.com/events/
Minneapolis.Org Event Calendar - https://www.minneapolis.org/calenda
City Pages Event Calendar - http://www.citypages.com/calendar
Growler Mag Event Calendar - https://growlermag.com/events/
City Pages Art - http://www.citypages.com/arts
submitted by AdamLikesBeer to TwinCities [link] [comments]

Recap of Today's Construction Update Press Conference

A rep from Okland Construction, which is overseeing the renovations at TSRA, says the @FOXSPORTSAZ broadcast stage will be where the Casino Arizona pavilion used to be, at the main entrance of the building.
See the white tape below the upper deck and around it? That's an LED ribbon board, one of two they will have there that goes around the arena. They will actually have the Ring of Honor come up on that. Rowley said they want that space to be constantly changing and not so static.
If any new images or news comes out, I will update it here in this post.
submitted by SavageSquirl to suns [link] [comments]

Red v. Blue: Color Symbolism & Americana in Twin Peaks

Note: I'm writing this as someone who has watched the entire original series, Fire Walk With Me, The Missing Pieces, and The Return, as well as other features from Lynch's filmography (Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, Elephant Man, Blue Velvet, Eraserhead); marked for spoilers now, do not proceed if you haven't seen them all. This is a longpost for Twin Peaks-obsessed nuts like me.
One of the things that remains a statement of the original incarnation (and thus, a statement by being substituted with HD digital cameras in The Return) is Twin Peaks's absolute mastery of the highly saturated 4:3 box TV aesthetic. I've heard Lynch was adamant the color palette not be corrected to a grittier, desaturated version when execs received the tapes. It's part of what's made so many iconic sequences and shots from the original run hallmarks of Tumblr and Instagram accounts aplenty. Twin Peaks came (and could be argued, ushered) on the precipice of a major shift in the television format. We would see the contemporary form of television media developed further with shows like The Sopranos in the HBO prime cable era, or The X-Files (no wonder Chris Carter plundered Twin Peaks's cast for his own attempt). As a marker for the end of the 80s and its preceding decades though, in many ways Twin Peaks to spoke to a form of TV largely since faded: soap operas and sitcoms and serials. It's part of why I loved the metatextual inclusion of the soap opera Invitation to Love, allowing the show to reference its own stylized dramaturgy.

Jade & Emerald... Jade give two rides, hm?
Very specifically, I find the series loves to riddle blue and red, like one oni to another. Fire and water. Hot-cold (like the shivery feeling Audrey gets when she holds an ice cube on her bare skin for a long time). The red and blue on Mike's TP varsity letterman jacket could be the most striking and concise marriage of this dynamic pairing. Donna & Maddie dive into this in the season 2 opener, scheming at the Double R (docked points for the silly jailhouse seduction routine by Donna, though). Subtler in palette but more obvious in Americana, Major Briggs's omnipresent blue uniform incorporates red in his breast patch (and Don S. Davis's ruddy-warm complexion, imo) speaking to his inherent patriotism as part of the Air Force. On more than one occasion Big Ed is spotted with a red & blue flannel.
Much to be said about the pairing of Bobby & Mike, comparing to BOB & MIKE; MIKE saw the face of God, but Bobby is the one who saw the light in this duo.
The flashing lights of a cop car. Dr. Jacoby's iconic 3D glasses-flavored shades (note that Jacoby and Ben both hailed from the Robert Wise-directed 1961 film adaptation of West Side Story, the famous 50s musical depicting rival gangs experiencing a Romeo & Juliet plot amidst culture clash in NYC). Lil the Dancer, communicating through expressive dance a coded message in FWWM. A barbershop quartet in the background behind Coop & Albert in "Coma".
I believe it's The Secret History of Twin Peaks book that is paired with red and blue filter lenses, so you can view certain hidden information? Either way, Lynch likes his 50s/60s Americana; reminds me of Castle Horror gimmicks.
The blue flower was a central Romanticism symbol; as blue roses don't occur in nature, they hold an air of mystery and fantastic possibility. Tennessee Williams used the blue rose to symbolize the fragile & unique character Laura(!!) in The Glass Menagerie.
The sign outside One-Eye Jack's. Red pairs often with green or black in gambling/casino situations; from the card deck motif for the sex workers to the mix-match patches of a roulette wheel. The malfunctioning lift for Leo in "The Orchid's Curse." The stage behind Julee Cruise during Roadhouse performances, especially "Lonely Souls." Even though the Red Room is known for its red, we see eventually that the Lodge holds strobing blue lights and the milky cataracts of doppelgangers. In a more peaceful sense, blue light washes over Laura as she smiles in the Lodge at the end of FWWM, reunited finally with her angel.
You can practically hear the buzz of the neon zapping into life from here. Knowing how important electricity is to Twin Peaks, these little details really stand out.
Ben and Jerry, at various times, switch between the two to complement each other much like the Miser Brothers. We also see it in Ben's interactions with Catherine; their affair in "Traces to Nowhere" finds Catherine clad in a powdery blue blanket, Ben's fiery tie, Catherine's ruby toenails (sidenote: not a fan of the Tarantino interaction). We see more of this Ben-Catherine color scheme in "Cooper's Dreams" during the Iceland convention with Leland's impromptu dancefloor breakdown. Ben, as central locus for Twin Peaks's criminal element, seems to be a lightning pole for these color dynamics. Notable is his integral need as a character to keep his publicly clean image and seedy underworld dealings separate, the perfect human symbol for Lynch's sequence in Blue Velvet's intro depicting the rotting & squirming insects buried beneath the idyllic Levittown surface of Lumberton. And Ben, even beyond his perennial cigar, enjoys many scenes by the fire of a hearth.
Ben floats through the two by himself on a regular basis, which I think ties into his role as the uber 80s corporate & cold American businessman, espousing social niceties & charm but hiding his sinister and impulsive skeletons in the closet. It's almost like he should be Lodge, but he's only run parallel to it as a human being.
Likewise, when it comes to the Lodge, BOB and the Man from Another Place/The Arm make a perfect red-blue pair. I noticed this especially in FWWM during the chaotic convenience store sequence. Given that during the night the sky can range from black as a cup of Coop's coffee to a Prussian shade, by following a Goethe color theory mindset, we can admit "Blue is a darkness weakened by light." BOB never comes off weak, but as a possessing spirit, for the viewer, his sudden appearances/reveals herald a (at times literal) spotlight into the black oil that is his essence (follow this link for a Youtube vid that informed some of my own theories). Goethe characterizes blue as common (think of country folk and bikers and truckers), as well as cold and melancholy, powerful. Red is much easier for The Arm; in addition to evoking the Christian iconography of a devilish imp figure, he is pure fire, the kind that truly walks with you (Goethe considers red as beautiful, dignified, closer to the essence of light; perhaps this echoes the Neoclassical Venus statue found often with Red Room curtains, or the red lipstick of the various beautiful women commonly prey to Twin Peaks).
BOB's always clad in blue denim to match The Arm's impish red suit. Noticeable since they remain the two most active agents as Lodge creatures, continuing the BOB/MIKE dualism that existed pre-show.
Given the only color left to throw in is white (HMM,, White Lodge? Sarah's pale horse? Leland's hair? The stuffed arctic fox in Ben's office? That weird long-faced elk thing at the Packard-Martell house? Pete and Coop enjoying/trying to order a mug of milk? The Tremond/Chalfont boy's white mask?) and you have the Star-Spangled Banner itself (the mini-flag at Twin Peaks Sheriff's office that flanks Coop while he's sitting across the table from Dr. Jacoby, as well as Coop's fixation on the full-sized incarnation while he's in the Bros. Fusco's office during his Dougie stint in The Return, are just two instances). Notable as a tri-color national aesthetic, red white & blue sometimes finds its way back in altered forms: straightforward visual representation with the Icelandic investors, as well as more tonally & artistically-derived influence from Lynch's favorite country (we'll forget the agonizing French hookup leaving scene from The Return and think more of Monica Bellucci's dream sequence, or Ben & Jerry orgasming over fresh baguettes with brie).
Great shot from Tim Hunter here.
Part 9, \"This is the chair.\" I remember this sequence being a spark of sorts, tantalizing to see Coop stir somewhat from his Dougie stupor.
While it should come as no surprise an American show would have many American-specific themes, I'm often convinced that Lynch is using the visual shorthand to simultaneously sing, criticize, celebrate, and reflect on what it means to be America. It is not coincidence that Dale Bartholomew Cooper's name reflects the notorious Pacific Northwest hijacker D.B. Cooper, or Harry Truman with the 33rd President (who, mind you, ordered the atomic bombs dropped in WWII). Or Franklin "Frank" Truman with the 32nd, for that matter. Coop openly ponders the Kennedy assassination (itself rife for conspiracy theories and speculation, much like TP) in a log to Diane, as well as Marilyn Monroe's involvement with the family; who else is Laura Palmer but a hometown Monroe?
Much like D.B. Cooper, Coop took a historic leap.
I would love to dig down deep and really review all of his work to understand more about Lynch's fixation on Lincoln (a portrait is in the Donna/James classroom when Laura's death is announced; a dramatic shot in Blue Velvet fixates on Lincoln Street which divides the town's good/bad parts & has an antagonist by the name of Booth; the "Gotta light?" Woodsman in The Return).
Now if someone could explain this connection... Dick says this right before the fire alarms go off and swamp Leland with water while BOB rams Leland's head in to break his last vessel and escape from justice.
Why Lincoln? I refer to it as The House Divided. Lincoln is one of the most recognizable presidents, partially due to his assassination (Kennedy echo), partially due to his role in the Civil War and how America resolved its most divisive internal conflict. He's emblematic of the Old America and the New America, slavery and post-slavery, secession and preservation. Somewhat like Republicans & Democrats, red v. blue. We know the toy Lincoln Logs, we hear the term Lincoln Lawyer, he's even one of the faces on Mt. Rushmore (referenced explicitly in The Return - "There they are Albert, faces of stone"- as well as compositionally in "Cooper's Dreams"); given the existence of both a Black Lodge and White Lodge in mythos, I think it's safe to draw at least some broad comparison to black America and white America (as well as Windom Earle's fetish for chess). Even as a goofier entry during Season 2's decaying period, Ben's mental lapse into General Robert E. Lee and fixation on the Civil War (mirroring Johnny Horne's fixation with the indigenous headdress and colonist America) gives some meat to this motif. Although it's never quite outright verbalized in show, one gets the sense that America is inherently built on some original sins. The water in the well was poisoned before the Trinity test
Notable too for the context of having Hawk (Nez Perce) included in this recreation. Mt. Rushmore was originally a sacred place for the Lakota Sioux; its present condition is considered desecration to their culture. America in its current incarnation was founded on the genocide and forced relocation of its indigenous peoples; Twin Peaks is loaded with Native American patterns and imagery, i.e. The Great Northern.
Note as well that red, by itself, can easily be tied to Twin Peaks's lifeforce, and by extension Lynch's entire repertoire. Fire. Red velvet curtains. Lipstick and nail polish. Blood. Pete's fisherman flannel. Audrey's heels, and her cherry trick. Norma's cherry pie. Log Lady's frames. "Let's rock" on Agent Desmond's car in FWWM. The women at One-Eye Jack's. The blooming roses peaking through white picket fences in Blue Velvet. The vast majority of neon signage (The Roadhouse especially). The traffic light at Sparkwood & 21. Leo's ostentatious Corvette. The lifeline zigzags on the high school walls. MIKE, in Philip Gerard, is fond of red tops, connecting him directly with The Arm. Much is made of Twin Peaks's proximity to Canada in the original series; the corrupt Mountie during the internal investigation arc stands out. The balloons at Dougie's corporate plaza. The Scarlet Letter. Lancelot Court, red door. Laura Palmer's Secret Diary.
Night time, my time. Red can be a carnal color, igniting passion, but also a warning to stop, turn back. Often we find it in the company of characters who have experienced a lot in Lynch's world, and not too much good.
And blue too. Blue is much more sparing in Twin Peaks, to greater mystical effect. Blue Rose. Laura's cold lips in the Pilot. Blue Velvet. Isabella Rossellini's dramatic eyeshadow as Dorothy Vallens. The waitress outfits at the Double R Diner. Leo's button-down when Shelly shoots him. The light in the morgue as Hawk tails Philip Gerard. The lifeline zigzags on hospital monitors (how they spike with Ronette, how they fall flat when Leland strangles Jacques). Ronette is swaddled in soft blue blankets during the S2 opener, her tilted head recalls Marian imagery (interesting from a Madonna-Whore complex standpoint); two episodes later her IV drip is tainted with blue dye, a visit from BOB. Maddie Ferguson's nightgown during her carpet-stain vision. Coop's iconic jammies. Rita's blue key & Betty's blue box in Mulholland Drive. The woman's hair at Club Silencio. Whenever television sets or camera footage shows up onscreen in Twin Peaks, there's a noticeable cool blue tint: think of that first tape, Laura & Donna dancing in the woods; the static showcased in the opening credits to FWWM; the footage of Coop gambling, obsessed over by Jean Renault. Gordon & Albert speaking together after meeting with Mr. C and watching Tammy walk away. Flashes of lightning. The sign at the Luna Lounge, where Fred Madison plays his discordant sax solo in Lost Highway.
Two dead girls wash up in the water. Calhoun Memorial's morgue stays bathed in blue light. Louise Bourgeois claimed it as hallmark, stating blue left behind \"the drabness of day-to-day reality\" for \"a world of freedom\", inner truths. BOB is certainly free.
Beyond red and blue, the colors I tend to notice in Twin Peaks are pink and green (notable for following a warm/cool polarization as well), which do not concern themselves to the same extent with Americana, if at all. Pink is much more sparse in its application, typically feminine: Nadine's prom dress during her suicide attempt in the S1 finale; Naido/Diane's bathrobe in The Return; the drapes behind the new One-Eyed Jack's girl Ben sleeps with in "Zen" (purposefully designed to evoke a vagina, in my opinion); fudging into purple, but we can count the Mauve Zone and Coop's run-in with Naido to an extent; Gersten Hayward's princess outfit during her piano performance for the Palmers; the trio of Candie, Mandie & Sandie; the gut-churning Pink Room sequence from FWWM with Laura & Donna.
Candie was a surprising standout for The Return. I felt these girls were a commentary on One-Eyed Jack's in the way the Mitchum Bros. were commentary on Ben & Jerry; where Ben & Jerry enjoyed public acceptance but indulged in dark secrets and ran through vulnerable sex workers, Bradley & Rodney have a dark reputation/entrance but ultimately possess hearts of gold, rescuing at-risk women like these three.
Green is more expansively utilized, and supernatural in tone: the billowing leaves of those Douglas firs in an ominous breeze; the iconic Twin Peaks font's outline; the guiding light we see through Dougie's eyes (which I assume has always been a part of Coop's psyche and intuition); Dougie's iconic oversized jacket; the infamous Owl Cave ring; the vintage lampshade adorning Ben's desk; the childhood bike Ben fondly recalls in The Return; the framed picture of the tall pine in the Sheriff's Department lobby; the tiny fir stuffed by the partition in the Palmer household; Jade & Emerald, even. Ben says to Leo, conspiring to burn the mill in "The One-Armed Man" - "Three nights, Leo. Green light." Something about it reminds me of Jay Gatsby's over-analyzed yearning green light from the F. Scott Fitzgerald classic; the idea of the American Dream with wanton capitalism, and how it's impossible to achieve (am I crazy for thinking there's a connection between Big Ed's Gas Farm's neon egg sign and the West Egg/East Egg class divide?).
Of course, the owls are watching. Much like the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg.
Ed's business harkens to how convenience stores (early-to-mid-century modernist American consumerism) were both the pumping blood and desiccated bone of our culture, as well as the Woodsmen womb. It also reminds me of old-style egg timers, and what is Twin Peaks but a show obsessed with the manipulation and perception of time? Was it the chicken or the egg that came first? Is it future or is it past?
By the time of The Return, we have lost these overly saturated tones, but the direct symbolic use of color is still integral to a Peaks viewing. I find it even more interesting that The Return made extensive use of black & white footage. Eraserhead and The Elephant Man alike (I've found both hold the spores for concepts and aesthetics fully developed in Lynch's later filmography, like the chevron Lodge floor pattern we all dearly love) were filmed in this manner; I feel Lynch chose this as nod to this earlier work, as well as the old formats of pre-color TV and film, like WWII newsreels. I find it relevant as well that older generations dream in black & white, a vanishing phenomenon which is directly related to the media of their era. B&W film informed the visual rhetoric of their unconscious minds; we, as younger Americans, dream in Technicolor.
This is the first shot we see of The Elephant Man. Notice how this is specifically his left arm, hand floating over the flame. Later in the film during a particularly moving sequence, Merrick first proves he is capable of speech for the first time by reciting the 23rd Psalm in a louder and louder tone, mirroring Annie Blackburn's prayers while Windom Earle led her bound into the Lodge.
The black & white sequences occur within the Lodge, relate directly to the Lodge - may Part 8 live forever in its atomic power - or otherwise involve unexplained phenomena (Cole's Monica Bellucci dream). By the time of The Return, a disconnect with the past and nostalgia is a core theme. The colors have faded. Coop, a half-baked shadow of himself, only gets restored by the chance mention of Gordon Cole's name in Sunset Blvd. Note Billy Wilder's 1950 film revolves around an aging actress lost in the reverie of her long-gone prime. (Also note her insistence, when William Holden's character asks her about the Salome film script, she's not conducting a "comeback" but a *return*; this, I feel, ties in as well to Major Briggs's underappreciated vision scene, emphasizing the idea of a return.) Although not shot in black & white, Pete, assisting Catherine as she tears apart their library, pauses for a moment during "The Last Evening" to linger on his high school yearbook. He's lost in the old pre-color photos, in the memory of Midge Jones, a man we never know. He's returned to a place in his youth, much like Garland's return to the gleaming, radiant marble of the fantastic palazzo in his S2 vision.
These two live in a retro-futurist Art Deco fever dream, accompanied the very appropriate Slow 30s Room soundtrack piece. Everything about the Fireman & Senorita Dido tells me of an America past its prime. I'm also convinced this was what Lynch envisioned for Briggs's palazzo; if only Don S. Davis was alive for The Return.
There's a plethora more I could get into, definitely for another thread: the preoccupation with trinities, animals, rings, technology, fine art references, and sonic elements are on my mind as well. I need to rewatch The Return again soon so more connections and thoughts are present. Let me know if you guys enjoyed this rambling mess!
submitted by shnoop1025 to twinpeaks [link] [comments]

Weekend rundown March 6th-9th

Around Town:
Movies:
Sports:
Reddit - Twin Cities Social meet-ups - https://www.reddit.com/twincitiessocial/
Minnesota Brewery Event Calendar - https://minnesotabreweries.com/event-directory
Minneapolis Park Events - https://www.minneapolisparks.org/events/
Secrets of the city - http://www.secretsofthecity.com/
Minnesota Monthly Event Calendar - http://www.minnesotamonthly.com/Calenda
MSP Magazine Event Calendar - http://mspmag.com/search/event/events-calenda#page=1
Minneapolis Northwest Event Calendar - https://www.minneapolisnorthwest.com/events/
Minneapolis.Org Event Calendar - https://www.minneapolis.org/calenda
City Pages Event Calendar - http://www.citypages.com/calendar
Growler Mag Event Calendar - https://growlermag.com/events/
City Pages Art - http://www.citypages.com/arts
submitted by AdamLikesBeer to Minneapolis [link] [comments]

CORONAVIRUS (PA) CONFIRMED CASE 5 MILES AWAY.. and i lost my job..

We have the first confirmed case around 5 miles from here. This is no surprise and was going to happen in the next few days anyway. I went to Giant Eagle and Walmart to see what they have left and people are freaking out and emptying out the store.
**update** Worst case scenario has gone down, we are in lock down all stores and jobs have been shut down for 2-8 weeks so looks like I got some time off....

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald and Health Director Dr. Debra Bogen are calling on non-essential businesses to close for at least two weeks beginning tomorrow.
ADVERTISING
The list included:
“This is an unprecedented challenge that our community is facing,” Fitzgerald said. “This is an unprecedented time in our community. Our region has always been at its best when we work together, and this challenge is no exception. We need everyone to step up and play a part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 in our region. We understand that this may cause hardship for some, and frustration for others, but it’s imperative that we work together to do what’s best for our community.”
They are calling on these businesses to implement alternative work strategies so they can help stem the spread of coronavirus.
There is still much unknown about this virus and the illness it causes. But there are some things we know already,” said Dr. Bogen. “We know the virus is or will soon be spreading in virtually every community in the US and indeed in the world. Given the contagiousness of this virus, we know that it will not slow down on its own until it has infected most people in every community. The best hope we have for averting this catastrophic outcome is to take aggressive action to dramatically slow down the spread of the virus in our community.”
The goal of asking these businesses to close is to help further the cause of social distancing.
While restaurants and bars are included in the list, they are still encouraging them to remain open but only for delivery or carryout.
They would like churches and other religious organizations to remain open for social services and the community but to refrain from social gatherings and services.
Grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations are not part of this recommendation.
“We fully recognize the impact that these recommendations will have on our community, their livelihoods, their mental health, their day-to-day needs. We are working collaboratively to put the systems in place that can meet those challenges,” said Fitzgerald. “We will also be calling on those of you who are healthy and able to assist those of our community who are not. We hope to have additional announcements regarding those plans in the coming days.”


sources https://www.wtae.com/article/coronavirus-cases-pittsburgh-western-pennsylvania/31552064
https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2020/03/15/county-asking-businesses-to-close-voluntarily/

here are the videos i have taken over the last few days:
CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN VLOG DAY 1: State of Emergency https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shcVokhZcp8
CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN VLOG DAY 2: CONFIRMED CASE 5 MILES AWAY.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUD3yT_CQuM
CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN VLOG DAY 3: LOST MY JOB.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byXCUeZRKS0
submitted by steviepax to CoronavirusUS [link] [comments]

Weekend rundown Feb 28th - Mar 1st

Around Town:
Movies:
Sports:
Reddit - Twin Cities Social meet-ups - https://www.reddit.com/twincitiessocial/
Minnesota Brewery Event Calendar - https://minnesotabreweries.com/event-directory
Minneapolis Park Events - https://www.minneapolisparks.org/events/
Secrets of the city - http://www.secretsofthecity.com/
Minnesota Monthly Event Calendar - http://www.minnesotamonthly.com/Calenda
MSP Magazine Event Calendar - http://mspmag.com/search/event/events-calenda#page=1
Minneapolis Northwest Event Calendar - https://www.minneapolisnorthwest.com/events/
Minneapolis.Org Event Calendar - https://www.minneapolis.org/calenda
City Pages Event Calendar - http://www.citypages.com/calendar
Growler Mag Event Calendar - https://growlermag.com/events/
City Pages Art - http://www.citypages.com/arts
submitted by AdamLikesBeer to Minneapolis [link] [comments]

Boston 10 Day Trip Report: A Total Immersion Travel Experience in New England's Flagship City

I went to Boston for the first time in a few years and got the chance to visit family and friends. I spent 10 days in the area and got the chance to immerse myself in the city.
Weekend 1 Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/5n5HDu
Monday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/yzKR35
Tuesday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/44E7x2
Wednesday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/2rwX3x
Thursday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/Lq59F0
Friday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/5BR296
Weekend 2 Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/99Zx6i

Boston is a coastal flagship city which is one of the oldest cities in the country. The history carries on to this day and as the 10th largest metropolitan area in the country it leads the nation (and world) in education, healthcare, public transportation, and athletics. There is a distinct culture around the city, a substantial depth of fine arts and a defining resilience that makes Boston unique. While the area is very populated it does feel extremely close knit, there is no wonder why it is called ‘The Town.’
When I visit places I like to do what I call a ‘total immersion,’ where I become a local as best as possible and see and do things from all walks of life. I experienced delays on the T, crazy drivers on the Mass Pike, experienced the opening of the Ballet and felt the energy of an evening game at Fenway. I climbed up many hills from Savin Hill, Bunker Hill, Telegraph Hill, Prospect Hill, Corey Hill and many others. I went to farmers markets, grocery stores and local neighborhood eats. I visited libraries, parks and countless universities. I took a variety of transit trips on foot, bike, bus, ferry and rail. I took in the skyline from all angles near and far, from the seaport to South Boston and beyond to the Noanet Woodlands. I did my best to get a clear picture of all facets of life in Beantown.
In the 3 days I had a BlueBike I rode 92 miles utilizing 36 stations. I rode on all 5 major T lines: Blue, Green (B,C,D,E) Orange, Red (Ashmont, Braintree), Silver (SL4) and utilized 30 stations.
I visited 41 different parks, from small urban gardens to large forests with lush views.
Boston is a city that feels extremely vibrant and academic but at the same time it can be quite blue collar, it just depends on where you go. From the youthful energy of Cambridge to the more mature and laid back Brookline, from the ritzy Back Bay to the gritty winding streets of Roxbury... Boston carries on with confidence, for this is Titletown a city core to the formation of our country. This is where our founding fathers made history, this is where English civilization came to fruition in North America.
I had an incredible time in Boston, it is a truly wonderful city and up there with the finest in the world. It is a large, open and welcoming community with a small town at heart. Thank you Boston for the great experiences I will always have the city on my mind.

Raves
-Tons of vibrancy in the core city, lots of pedestrians and cyclists
-Universites
-Hospitals and medical institutions
-Parks with great views and variety of landscapes
-Arts institutions, public libraries
-BlueBike system, tons of stations with bikes in good condition and $10 day pass
-Fenway park, an absolute treasure and finest ballpark in baseball with the best ushers and staff
-Cheap and convenient public transit system, week unlimited pass is a deal
-Tons of history throughout the city and surrounding areas
Rants
-Vibrancy goes down significantly after hours, not much open at night past 9pm
-Massholes
-Old and slow trolley and subway system
-Road network makes no sense whatsoever

Blue Bike Stations Used:
30 Dane St
Alewife MBTA at Steel Place
Ball Sq
Beacon Street & David G Mugar Way
Beacon Street & Massachusetts Avenue
Broadway T Stop
Cambridge Main Library at Broadway / Trowbridge St
Central Square Post Office Bluebikes Stations
Centre Street & Seaverns Avenue
Chinatown T Stop
Columbia Rd at Tierney Community Center
Dartmouth Street & Boylston Street
Franklin Park - Seaver St. at Humbolt Ave
Green Street T Bluebikes Station
Harrison Avenue & Bennet Street
Harvard Square at Mass Ave/ Dunster
Hayes Square - Vine St at Moulton St
Hyde Square - Barbara St at Centre St
ID Building East
ID Building West
Ink Block - Harrison Ave at Herald St
Jackson Square Bluebikes Station
JFK/UMass T Stop
Kennedy-Longfellow School 158 Spring St
Main St at Thompson Sq
MIT at Mass Ave / Amherst St
One Broadway
Roslindale Village - Washington St
S Huntington Ave at Heath St
Savin Hill T Stop - S Sydney St at Bay St
Stony Brook T Stop
Stuart St at Charles St
Union Square - Somerville
University of Massachusetts Boston - Campus Center
Upham's Corner T Stop - Magnolia St at Dudley St
Wentworth Institute of Technology - Huntington Ave at Vancouver St

MBTA Stations Utilized:
Airport
Alewife
Aquarium
Back Bay Station
Boston Univ. East
Broadway
Chestnut HIll
Chinatown
Cleveland Circle
Copley
Downtown Crossing
Dudley Square Government Center
Green Street
Harvard
Harvard Avenue
Haymarket Station
Jackson Square
JFK / UMass
Kenmore
Longwood
Massachusetts Ave
Museum of Fine Arts
North Station
Quincy Center
Ruggles
Stony Brook
Summit Avenue
Symphony Station
Wellington

Eateries:
Bazaar on Cambridge
City Feed and Supply
Courthouse Seafood
Dunkin (original location)
Exodus Bagels
Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Finagle A Bagel
Gene’s Chinese Flatbread Cafe
J.P. Licks (original location)
Joe’s Famous Steak Subs
JP Whole Foods Market
Kupel’s Bakery
Market Basket
South End Whole Foods Market
Sweet Rice JP Thai Sushi
Tasty Burger (original location)
Trader Joe’s Back Bay
Trillium Brewing Company

Parks:
Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge
Back Bay Fens
Berkeley Community Garden
Blackstone Square
Boston Common
Boston National HIstorical Park
Boston Public Garden
Bunker HIll Monument
Castle Island
Channel Park
Chester Park
Copley Square
Corey HIll Overlook Park
Dorchester Heights
Dorchester Shores Reservation
East Boston Greenway
Fan Pier Park
Forest Hills Cemetery
Franklin Park
Franklin Square
Harriet Tubman Memorial
Jamaica Pond
Larz Anderson Park
LoPresti Park
Louisburg Square
M Street Beach
Malibu Beach
Millennium Park
Noanet Woodlands
North Point Park
Olmsted Park
Paul Revere Park
Peters Park
Prospect Hill Park
Reservoir Walking Trail (Weston Reservoir)
Riverbend Park
Savin HIll Park
Seven Hills Park
Thomas J Butler Memorial Park
Titus Sparrow Park

Attractions:
Boston City Hall
Boston College
Boston Opera House
Boston Public Library
Boston Symphony Hall
Boston University Bridge
Cambridge Public Library
Chinatown Gate
Coolidge Corner Farmers Market
Copley Place
Copp’s Hill Burying Ground
Drydock Center
Dugout Cafe
Encore Boston Harbor
Fenway Park
Gillette World Shaving Headquarters
Hancock Cemetery
Harvard Bridge
Harvard Business School
Harvard Stadium
Harvard Yard
Honan-Allston Branch of the Boston Public Library
John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site
John W. Weeks Footbridge
Long Wharf (South)
Longwood Medical and Academic Area
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts State House
Medford Square
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Northeastern University
Paul Revere Statue
Samuel Adams Boston Brewery
Seaport World Trade Center
Shirley-Eustis House
Skywalk Obervatory
Sowa OPen Market
The James Blake House 1661
The Old House at Peace Field- Adams National Historical Park
Thomas Crane Public Library
Tuft University

Detail Notes:

Thursday
-Fly from Cincinnati CVG to Boston Logan while making a connecting flight stop in DCA
-Arrive at Logan in terminal B, I love the new terminal with large glass windows with the view of downtown
-My family picks me up and we immediately head to East Boston
-We walk around East Boston and check out the skyline views from LoPresti Park
-There is a lot of new development in the neighborhood, it feels like Boston’s version of Long Island City
-Walk back to the car and go by the East Boston Greenway
-We drive under the tunnel into downtown and then drive to the Seaport and park on A St.
-Grab beers at Trillium Brewing Company from the outdoor patio
-Then we go for a walk first around Fan Pier Park and then cross the Fort Point Channel into downtown
-Walk to Faneuil Hall Marketplace and get dinner, I get a platter from the Indian vendor, I love that there is a Magnolia Bakery vendor which I remember getting the banana pudding at the Upper West Side location in NYC
-Drive out to Natick to stay in Hotel

Friday
-Go out with family to Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge
-Walk around the beautiful Puffer Pond
-Walk on the trails and see some of the ammunition storage bunkers
Saturday
-Go to Bat-Mitzvah with family

Sunday
-Spend more time with family, go to relatives house in Jamaica Plain where I would stay for the week
-Go for a run around the Weston Reservoir
-Go out to the JP Licks on Centre St.
-Walk to the Jamaica Pond at night

Monday
-Wake up and go to the Centre St/Seaverns Ave Blue Bike station and pick up a bike
-Ride bike to Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University and bike up to the top of Peters Hill and catch the great view
-Bike down through Roslindale Village then to the Forest Hill station, I love all of the bike/walk trails and bike parking
-I then enter the SW Corridor Park and bike up to the Jackson Square station
-There are tons of other bike commuters making for an enjoyable ride with other fellow people on the trails
-I go to the Stop & Shop to get some chewy bars
-I continue biking down past the JP Whole Foods and make my way to Jamaica Pond where I bike around the Pond counter-clockwise
-A person lets me know I cannot bike on the path in the SW portion of the park so I head for the road on Francis Parkman Dr. and feel very uncomfortable with all of the cars, but once I get to Perkins St. I go back to the trail
-I then make my way up the Emerald Necklace, passing through Olmstead Park
-I go by Longwood Medical area, the MFA and the Back Bay Fens
-I make it to the Massachusetts Ave and take in the views of Cambridge and the Boston skyline
-I bike down through the Back Bay and to the Boston Public Library
-Inside former governor Bill Weld is doing an interview with WGBH and I sit in for a few minutes
-I then walk around and check out the Norman Leventhal map room which I love
-I then check out the various rooms in the old section of the library including the main reading room, which is beautiful and not too crowded or swarmed with tourists (unlike the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building in NYC public library)
-Bike over to the Boston Public Garden and check out the landscaping
-Then walk through Beacon Hill, I love the historic streets and architecture
-Check out Louisburg Square, which feels like a small version of Gramercy Park
-Walk to the Massachusetts Statehouse and go inside
-Check out the House of Representative Chamber and Senate Chamber
-I talk with one of the guards (who has a very strong Boston accent) who tells me I should visit the Governor's Foyer and tells me to look for Bill Weld’s portrait which is different from all the others, so I go and visit and it is very different!
-I leave the statehouse and go to the Granary Burying Ground, it is amazing to see such and old Cemetery and I check out the graves of John Hancock and Paul Revere
-Walk to Downtown Crossing (DTX) and I am very impressed by the pedestrian only streets and vibrancy
-I get noodles with a lamb skewer at Gene's Chinese Flatbread Cafe which is very good
-I then walk through Chinatown by the Chinatown Gate and love seeing all of the elderly people playing card games at Mary Soo Hoo Park
-I bike over through the seaport to the Seaport World Trade Center and catch the amazing views
-Continue to bike over to the Reebok World Headquarters and checkout the store/crossfit studio
-I bike around the drydocks, I really like the AT-AT looking cranes
-I then bike over Summer St. and then to 1st street to Thomas J Butler Memorial Park and then make my way to Castle Island
-I dismount my bike (not suppose to bike along the paths on Castle Island) and walk around the Fort Independence and check out the views of planes landing at Logan, I do see quite a few large jets landing from overseas
-I walk around Pleasure Bay to Head Island and then get back on my bike after going to the Harbourwalk
-I bike along M Street Beach and then make my way up to Dorchester Heights up on Telegraph Hill. This area has great views of downtown and feels somewhat like San Francisco
-I bike back over Traveler St. through Channel Park and then go to the Chinatown Orange Line and Ride to Stony Brook
-I then bike over to Franklin Park where I check out White Stadium as there is a high school soccer game going on
-Then bike around the park stopping by the gates of the Zoo and then the Franklin Park Overlook Ruins
-Then I go back where I am staying in JP and go for a run...making a loop from the Pond to the SW Corridor Park then down to Forrest Hills then back up to the Pond

Tuesday
-Walk to Green street and take Orange Line to DTX...then transfer to Red Line, it is very crowded on the platford at the crossing
-Ride North on Red Line crossing the Charles River and to Alewife
-Station feels very Eurpean as there are lots of buses and bike parking
-Bike along Somerville Community Path to Davis station
-Bike north to Medford and check out Tufts University Campus, I love the buildings and greenery
-Bike north across the Mystic River and then to Medford Square
-Continue biking south to Magoun Square, checking out the very residential streets of Somerville
-Go to Market Basket to get some more chewy bars and get a sports drink
-Bike down to Harvard
-Check out the Harvard campus, I first start on the east side of campus and then make my way to the Harvard Yard and Harvard Square
-Bike over to the Cambridge Public Library for a quick phone charge
-Bike over through Inman Square and Union Square
-Bike up to Prospect Hill Park and check out the views of downtown Boston
-Bike through the Central Redline stop and bike over to the west side of the MIT campus to BU bridge
-Bike across BU bridge and check out all of the students crossing the street during class changes on Commonwealth Ave
-Bike back across the bridge taking in the view and then bike along the river on the Dr. Dudley White Bike Path
-When I get to Massachusetts Ave I walk around campus (I get a tour guide map) and check out some of the cool buildings such as Kresge Auditorium and the great dome. The MIT campus is much more visitor friendly than Harvard, you can really go in a lot more buildings
-Then I bike over to check out the Kendall Square area and check out MIT Sloan
-I make my way up to East Cambridge and have a salmon platter at Courthouse Seafood
-I then bike down through North Point Park and Paul Revere Park to Charlestown
-I check out the Boston National Historical Park on the water and then make my way into Charlestown
-I like Charlestown is does have a similar feeling to South Boston and is surprisingly nicer than I thought it would be and lots of very nice looking housing
-I make my way to the Bunker Hill Monument
-Then I run down to catch the ferry (which is included with 7-day MBTA pass) at the Charlestown Navy Yard Ferry Terminal
-Take 7 minute Ferry ride to the Aquarium Terminal and get great views of the harbour and downtown
-I take the Blue Line from the Aquarium to Government Center
-Then I take the D train Green Line to Kenmore
-Get off at Kenmore and walk to Fenway Park, I walk around the park before the gates open and get in line
-Go inside the park (get Bathan Eovaldi bobblehead giveaway) then check out the team store
-Inside awesome teamstore, I go to the back room where there is memorabilia and get an autograph from Julian Tavarez
-I walk into the stadium and I walk right down to home plate, then over to left field and onto the Green Monster, then on the upper deck around to right field, then down to the bleachers then back behind home plate. I love how you are allowed to go nearly everywhere in the park before the game starts (as opposed to Wrigley Field or Yankee Stadium). The ushers are so friendly and really go out of their way to make a great experience.
-Go to 5th row in Grandstand section 19 to watch the game which is a great view
-See a lot of Red Sox Legends in the Park (Pedro Martinez and Carlton Fisk)
-See Mike Yastrzemski hit a home run and the crowd gives a standing ovation
-Leave game and head to Tasty Burger
-Walk across the Fens and see a movie being filmed at the MFA coming to Netflix called ‘The Sleepover’
-Catch 39 Bus back to accommodation
Wednesday
-Wake up and bike over to Exodus Bagels, I get a plain with cream cheese
-Bike through Roxbury, go by Boston Latin Academy and up through Dudley Square
-Check out the Shirley-Eustis House
-Bike to Upham’s Corner and check out the Dorchester North Burying Ground. I love all of the street art murals in Roxbury and Dorchester, while these are some of the poorer neighborhoods in the city, they still are not that down looking and have a good community feel
-Check out the James Blake House (built in 1661!)
-Bike to the JFK/UMass Red Line stop and head south to Quincy Center
-Check out downtown Quincy and visit Hancock Cemetery which is very cool (set apart in 1640!)
-Walk up to check out the Adams National Park Visitor Center and then the The Old House at Peace Field, then I walk to the Quincy Homestead
-Walk through Faxon Field and then go to the Original Dunkin Donuts on Southern Artery and get a 10 pcs munchkins (and immediately eat all of them)
-Walk back downtown and check out inside Thomas Crane Public Library
-Take Red Line back to JFK/UMass and bike along Dorchester Shores Reservation
-Bike around JFK Presidential Library and then check out the UMass Boston Campus, I take a break in the beautiful cafeteria overlooking the water and charge my phone and rest for a few minutes
-I then bike down around Savin Hill Cove past the Vietnam War Memorial and over to Malibu Beach
-Then I bike up to the top of Savin Hill but the view is disappointing as there really isn’t a view
-I then take the Red Line from Savin Hill to Broadway and check out the Gillette HQ complex and take in the views from the city
-I bike to the South End Whole Foods and get a turkey sandwich
-I then go to Emerson and check out the buildings there and eat my turkey sandwich and then walk through the North End
-I check out the Paul Revere Statue, Old North Church and Copp’s Hill Burial Ground
-Go to North Station and catch the Green E line to the MFA
-Check out the MFA which is very very impressive, my favorite section is the American landscape paintings. I also see some work done by Frank Duveneck who is from where I live in Covington, KY (right across the bridge from Cincinnati)
-Bike over to meet a friend at Harvard, to get there I bike through Longwood and catch the stunning sunset John W. Weeks Footbridge
-Take Red Line from Harvard Square to DTX then take Orange line to Jackson Square
-Bike to the JP Whole foods and get 2 cans of beans to eat
-Bike back to accommodation, eat beans and go to sleep

Thursday
-Wake up and take Orange Line to Wellington, there is a Dunkin in the stop and there are many locals waiting to get their fix
-Take the Encore shuttle to the Encore Casino (originally I got on the employee shuttle)
-Walk through the Casino and grounds, the physical plant is amazing and there are some nice views of the Mystic but overall I am not that impressed as the shopping is not that high end and the minimums are high for the table games
-I take the shuttle back to Wellington and then take Orange Line to Back Bay Station then I take the Green B line from Copley Square to Harvard Ave
-I then walk to Bazaar on Cambridge and get ½ pound of lox and a loaf of dark brown sourdough rye 'Borodinsky bread.'
-I eat outside at a local park right next to the Honan-Allston Branch of the Boston Public Library and then check out the library inside
-I then walk over to Harvard Stadium and check it out and the Harvard Business School and check out the campus and meet with a friend there briefly
-I catch the 66 bus back down to Harvard Ave into Brookline where I grab a bagel at Kupel's Bakery walk around and check out the JFK National Historic Site
-Then make my way down to Coolidge Corner and then check out the Brookline Farmers Market
-Then walk on Beacon Street and up Summit Ave to Corey Hill Overlook Park which the views are ok but then walk back down and catch the Green Line C train
-Get off at the end of the C train at Cleveland Circle and walk around Chestnut Hill Reservoir from the north side
-I then walk through Boston College Football stadium and the campus, which is very beautiful
-I then walk down Hammond St. to the Chestnut HIll D train and take it to Longwood station
-I walk through Longwood at all of the world class medical schools and institutions and walk by Boston Latin School
-I then walk through Northeastern campus and go to Ruggles station and catch a brand new Orange Line train which I take to Chinatown
-I then walk though the Boston Common and grab a Mcdonalds burgefries/McChicken and eat on a bench in the common and do some people watching
-Then I go to the Boston Opera House to see the premiere the 2019-2020 Boston Ballet which is a performance of Giselle which I love
-After the show then check out the new downtown Taco Bell but it is a complete mess so I just take an Uber back

Friday
-Wake up and go to Green St. Orange Line, there is a brand new train but it is going outbound to Forrest Hills so I take an old train to Massachusetts Ave station and walk through the SW Corridor Park. I love the juxtaposition of the historic walk ups to the towering skyscrapers
-I make my way to Harriet Tubman Square, Chester Park, Franklin Square and Jackson Square
-I walk through the Berklee Community Garden
-I then walk up to check out the Boston Marathon Bombing Memorial Finish Line and get a bagel w/cream cheese at Finagleabagel
-Then I meet some friends and walk through the Copley Place shops and then go up to the Skydeck on the top of the Prudential Building
-The views are great but I do not think worth the $20+ price of admission. Its is cool though to see all of the places I have been from a birds eye view, especially the water and all of the rowhouse neighborhoods
-Then take Prudential Green Line to Haymarket and check out the farmers market
-I then head to City Hall Plaza and take in the Boston Climate Strike
-Next I take Green Line E train from Government Center to Symphony Hall and go inside
-I see performance of the Boston Symphony I get a seat on the first balcony to have a view of the two piano concerto. There is also a world premiere piece commissioned by the BSO and Beethoven's Fantasia featuring The Tanglewood Festival Chorus.
-After the Symphony I take the Orange Line to Stoney Brook and get some bagels from City Feed
-In evening head to Millenium Park and go for a run, take trail down to the Charles River and then take in the sunset from atop the skyline loop
-Go out to dinner at Sweet Rice in JP

Saturday
-I go for a morning run, I first cross the Emerald Necklace into Brookline to check out Larz Anderson Park. Then I go through the Arboretum and the Bussey Brook Meadow to the Forest Hills Cemetery. I visit the burial places of Revolutionary War General Joseph Warren, Poet E.E. Cummings, Abolitionist William Llyod Garrison and Nobel Laureate Playwright Eugene O'Neil.
-Then I go to the Sam Adams Brewery and go for a toutasting where I try the Boston Lager, Oktoberfest, and Pumpkin Ale
-Then take 39 bus to the Back Bay and walk down Newbury St and check out all of the shops
-Get a burrito at the Back Bay Trader Joes and then walk to the Boston Common where the ‘Freedom Fest’ is taking place, there is a lot of smoke which I cannot handle so I walk around
-I check out the ‘Friends’ couch set and then take the Silver Line from Tuft Medical Center to Dudley Square
-I get a shredded beef sandwich at Joe’s which is really big just what I needed
-Then I take the 28 bus to the orange line back to JP
-At night I take 39 bus to Copley and take Green Line B train to Boston University East and I go see the Mendoza Line Comedy show at the Dugout Cafe

Sunday
-I wake up and take bus to the South end and check out the SoWa open market, I check out the food stalls, outdoor crafts market, indoor vintage market and artist studios
-I then grab some food at the South End Whole Foods and then take Orange Line/Orange line shuttle back to JP
-Then go for an afternoon run through the Noanet Woodland and catch the nice view of downtown Boston and forest from the top of the lookout

Monday
-Wake up before dawn, and take Orange Line to the Blue Line at Government Center and take the Blue Line to the Airport
-Check out the skyline from the terminal one last time and then fly back to CVG
submitted by redsox92 to boston [link] [comments]

Jamond Bullock Painting Live at Fitzgerald's Casino - YouTube Gordon Lightfoot - The Wreck of The Edmund Fitzgerald ... YouTube Un-Announced at Fitzgerald Casino - YouTube 2003 - Fitzgerald's Las Vegas Hotel Casino Promo Fitz - YouTube

Hey, are you Fitzgerald Casino Black Hawk Colorado looking for the top games? Here you can find selection of the best online casinos for the US players. This Fitzgerald Casino Black Hawk Colorado selection is based on promotions, bonuses, security, cash out options, reputation, software robustness, graphics, customer service, game diversity and the overall respect of the players. Live casino Casino Fitzgeralds games offer a real casino experience similar to what you will find at Las Vegas casinos. The games are streamed, and there is a live dealer. Furthermore, you can see and hear everything happening Casino Fitzgeralds at the table as well as enjoy the bonuses like you would if you were sitting in the casino. If you’re looking for a casino hotel in Tunica, Mississippi - you’ve found the best! Located right on the eastern banks of the Mississippi River - you’ll find more than 500 comfortable rooms and suites on nine floors in our hotel. We’ve got all the newest and most popular slot and video-poker machines. Plus, over 20 table games! Enjoy dining and drinking options from casual to ... Fitzgerald casino tunica ms State law is available, he played an indoor and he said foundation gaming entertainment. Welcome bonus - 1 km from more than 500 comfortable rooms. Within a service to us. Definitely upgrade from the casino hotel offers more. Warning: 40 million expansion of money. Featured amenities include express check-out, decently appointed, meeting rooms and teaching focused ... FITZGERALD'S CASINO HOTEL LAS VEGAS, OFFICIAL SITE. DISCOUNT PRICES, BEST DEALS, FITZGERALDS CASINO HOTEL LAS VEGAS. The Fitzgerald's Casino Hotel is a superior tourist class hotel. The new Fitzgerald's is clean, nice and comfortable. It was even nice enough to win a Governor's Conference award for Redesign. Fitzgerald's has two levels that each have attractive features. On the first floor you ... We tried the new Garden Buffet at the Saratoga casino, formerly Fitzgerald's, in Black Hawk this week. The experience was pleasing in every regard: -- A very satisfying selection of fresh, tasty food. -- Decent desserts (hard to come by at casinos, whether in Colorado or Vegas). -- Bright, pleasant atmosphere that seems unique to BH/CC. -- Friendly staff. -- Clean restrooms. Also, we liked the ... Fitzgerald Casino Tunica Hotel Useful Findings: Fitz Hotel Tunica is a luxurious property that houses 506 well-appointed guestrooms and suites. Accommodation options range from standard rooms to club-level rooms. The latter boast a walk-in shower and exquisite furniture. Guests at The Fitz Tunica Hotel need not go too far to enjoy world-class cuisines as the hotel has three restaurants and two ... Casino in Dublin, Dublin Casino, Poker Dublin, Poker Tournaments Dublin, Poker Tournament Ireland, Blackjack, Roulette, Live Dealer Casino Watch all of the action from the 2018 Partypoker Fitzwilliam Poker Championship on Eirsport .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 40.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, ... home; About Us. About The ... Fitzgerald Casino Hotel Matal Pewter Look Mr. O'Lucky Key Chain Las Vegas NV. Reno Tunica & Black Hawk Key Chain GOCRKAntiques. From shop GOCRKAntiques. 5 out of 5 stars (2,077) 2,077 reviews $ 5.00. Favorite Add to Vintage Fitzgeralds Casino Promotional Advertising Pen and Pencil Set ~ Black Hawk, CO SunnyAcresDream. From shop SunnyAcresDream ... Browse upcoming events and live entertainment near Minneapolis, MN at Jackpot Junction Casino Hotel. We bring you local, regional & national acts. Visit today! Call 1-662-363-5825; Facebook; Twitter; Instagram; Contact Us; Promotions; Minnesota’s Premier Casino Hotel. Home; Stay. Rooms; Amenities; Key Rewards; Gift Shop Re-Opens Soon; Private Events; Bus Tours ; Play. Key Rewards; Slots ...

[index] [29031] [18106] [1775] [33701] [15245] [17192] [9892] [5630] [9440] [8309]

Jamond Bullock Painting Live at Fitzgerald's Casino - YouTube

Fitzgerald's Casino Tunica Review- Room, Casino, Buffet - Duration: 2:48. ... New York-New York Hotel and casino, Las Vegas opening 1997 advertisement - Duration: 0:31. 上海灘大少爺 4,049 ... About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features Press Copyright Contact us Creators ... The band performed at Fitzgeralds Casino. TaUndria singing Need U Bad and fell in love with the first verse. crazy adlibs with Bird and the band was killin i... This is a live painting performace featuring Jamond Bullock of Alive Paint as well as Dr. Rico and Ryan the Mind of G Force. I do not own any rights to the music and will remove immediately upon request.Artist: Patrik FitzgeraldAlbum: Drifting Towards ViolenceYear: 1983Label: Himal... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. I don't upload very much, but when I do it's always the best. #gordonlightfoot#TheWreckofTheEdmundFitzgerald #gordonlightfootreactionsThe Wreck of The Edmund Fitzgeraldhttps://youtu.be/9vST6hVRj2AThank you for watching ...

#